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In 2021, more than 4,000 animals were treated by Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. This is the highest number treated in recent history. Take a look at a few photos of some of our interesting wild patients throughout the year, captured by volunteer photographer Ken Forman. If you find orphaned, injured, or sick wildlife, please call Greenwood at 303-823-8455 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily.

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Donate and benefit from tax write-offs in 2021! Below are a few deductions you can take advantage of when you give. Donate and benefit from tax write-offs in 2021! Below are a few deductions you can take advantage of when you give. Contributions benefit the thousands of wild patients we care for each year at Greenwood. This year, that was nearly 4,000 animals! Make a monetary donation If you donate via our website, a receipt will be emailed to you. If you make a cash donation at the…

What is Colorado Gives Day? Colorado Gives Day unites all Coloradans in a common goal to strengthen the state’s nonprofits by giving to their favorite charities online. Coloradans are encouraged to join the statewide Colorado Gives Day movement by supporting their favorite causes online through ColoradoGives.org. Give Where You Live on Colorado Gives Day, December 7, 2021. What is the $1 Million Incentive Fund? Every donation made through ColoradoGives.org on Colorado Gives Day is boosted by the incentive fund. For example, if a nonprofit organization receives 10 percent…

Why don’t ducks get frostbite when swimming in cold waters during the winter? Have you ever looked out into a cold pond and noticed the ducks playing happily in the water and wondered “How are they not freezing to death?” Well, it’s all due to the circulation in their feet! Ducks in particular do not have a lot of body fat to protect themselves during the cold winter months. It is crucial for them to minimize heat loss as much as possible. They do this through a unique,…

Halloween can be a dangerous time for wildlife, given all the exterior decorations and candy wrappers laying around. Below are a few examples of ways you can prevent wildlife from becoming harmed on this spooky holiday. Candy may be a treat for you, but the wrappers it comes in are a choking hazard for wildlife. This year especially, we will see more candy bowls left out on the front porch as a Covid-19 safety precaution. If you plan on doing so, keep a lid on the bowl so…

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Colorado is seeing more and more human-bobcat interactions. Habitat availability and a decrease in prey density in their natural ranges are just some of the reasons these cats are being sighted in more urban areas. It’s very important that you not only know how to identify a bobcat, but what to do if you run into one. Identifying a bobcat Bobcats are commonly mixed up with the lynx species as they look very similar at first glance. The bobcat is twice the size of a house cat and…

There are many ways you can help wildlife at home. Simple steps such as growing native plants, not using harmful pesticides on your yard, and providing water stations are all things that can essentially help the wellbeing of wildlife in your area. Growing Native Plants Planting native plants is a great way to support wildlife around your home and provide them with the right nutrients. Native plants provide birds with many benefits such as nesting materials, shelter, and food. The Common Sunflower is a great plant that provides…

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Oh no, you’ve found a bird’s nest in the old backyard tree you want to remove! What do you do? There are regulations regarding the moving or destroying of nests, so make sure to do your research before taking action. Here are some of the most important rules to know: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) states that it is illegal to “take (kill), possess, import, export, transport, sell, purchase, barter, or offer for sale, any migratory bird, or the parts, nests, or eggs of such bird except…

The local lagomorph rehabilitator at Colorado Wild Rabbit Foundation is planning to retire, leaving no one to care for bunnies from north Denver to the Wyoming border. In order for Greenwood to accommodate rising needs, we plan to build a new structure on our 2.84-acre property to accommodate the rabbits along the Front Range that need us! Greenwood has already raised the majority of the funds needed to build a new rabbit care facility, and we have started construction. Now we need your help. We need to complete…

Imagine you are flying over Boulder. The land is scattered with small bodies of water and Boulder Creek winds through town, looking like a icy black runway. As a large bird that has been migrating all day, you think one of these places might be a great spot to fish and rest. You begin to descend onto the ice but right as you are about to dip your webbed toes into the chilly slush, you realize this is not water at all. Your feet come to a halt…