American Goldfinches—A Harbinger of Summer’s Close Many people think of robins as harbingers of spring. I think of American Goldfinches as harbingers of the end of the avian breeding season. The...

Mallards—Where Have All the Males Gone? With the songbird breeding season winding down, let’s talk about waterfowl for a moment. The Mallard is the most familiar and widely distributed duck in...

House Finch—The Ubiquitous Fruit Biter Among the first native songbird species to make an appearance at Greenwood during baby bird season, House Finches are a very common sight in Colorado. They...

Swallows—Life on the wing North America has 9 swallow species; 6 species breed regularly in Colorado. The common name of “swallow” derives from the Anglo-Saxon “swalewe,” which described this group of...

Hummingbirds—It’s Not That They Don’t Actually Know the Words… I write about the natural history of birds for a variety of audiences. When I set out to write about a species,...

Northern Flicker—Unusual Toes, a Long Tongue and a “Chiseling” Beak Once upon a time, North America had 2 major flicker species—the more eastern Yellow-shafted Flicker and the more western Red-shafted Flicker....

Guest blogger Rachel Ames asks that very question. Read more about her observations! Read more…

The Bluebirds of North America—Carrying the sky on their backs Bluebirds are members of the thrush family, which also includes American Robins and a number of “spotted thrushes” such as Hermit...

Western Kingbirds—Little tyrants in the bird nursery! Western Kingbirds are common flycatchers found primarily in rural residential areas and lowland riparian woodlands in our area. In all, the U.S. has 7...

 American Robin—The Original Early Bird Can you imagine a spring or summer without robins, singing their bright “cheerily, cheerio, cheerily, cheer up” song? Michigan State University (my alma mater—go Spartans!) faced...