Donate to Wildlife Wednesday – Our Biggest Fundraiser of Spring

Wildlife Wednesday is April 20th!

Each year, Greenwood hosts an online fundraiser to help the animals we care for day in and day out. In 2022, Greenwood hopes to raise funds in honor of our biggest milestone yet, 40 years of rehabilitation! Each year we are able to provide help to over 200 species and thousands of wild critters in need. Will you donate on Wildlife Wednesday and help us achieve another 40 years of rehabilitation? Greenwood’s hard work treating orphaned and injured wildlife along the Front Range from north of Pueblo to the Wyoming border makes a huge difference to these animals and their rescuers.

Donations can be made online through Paypal, through Facebook, paid via phone by calling (303) 823-8455, or checks can be mailed to PO Box 18987 Boulder, CO 80308.

Check Greenwood’s Facebook!
We’ll post fundraising updates, fun tidbits from the past 40 years, videos of releases, and stories about current and previous patients throughout the day!

Animal Story: A baby squirrel gets a second chance

Have you heard the story of Toe, the baby squirrel with an injured paw? Recently, Greenwood admitted this young female Fox Squirrel in need of assistance. Her paw was injured and she seemed a little off, spinning in circles rather than crawling in a straight line. A caring Thornton resident noticed the baby in need and brought her to Greenwood. Have you heard the story of Toe, the baby squirrel with an injured paw? Greenwood recently admitted this young female Fox Squirrel in need of assistance. Her paw was injured and she seemed a little off, spinning in circles rather than crawling in a straight line. A caring Thornton resident noticed the baby and brought her to Greenwood. Upon examination, our medical team saw bones in her paw exposed. They brought her to our neighborly partners Lyons Vet Clinic, who generously allows Greenwood rehabilitators to take X-rays at their practice. After images of the squirrel’s paw were taken, it was found that one of her fingers would be unusable. The Lyons veterinarian offered to remove a portion of it to prevent further damage. She performed the rather simple procedure right then and there, using numbing agents to keep the baby pain-free. The removal site was wrapped and medicated before the squirrel was returned to Greenwood for a long nap with her other nestmates. Since then, the wound has healed seamlessly, and Toe is able to function much like a normal adolescent squirrel should. We plan to evaluate her paw intermittently throughout her stay with us. We hope that she will be just as successful as the other squirrels in the wild, even with one less finger.

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